Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Monday, August 10, 2020

ALL READING STRATEGIES THAT MAKE SENSE FOR THE DYSLEXIC READER

 

Cook’s Reading Strategy Summary

 

** PowerPoint Available

***Video Available

1)      Introduce 3 (before, during, after reading) strategies in Whole Group (I do)

2)      Practice Strategies in Small Group (We do)

3)     Students Practice in Centers (You do)

Goal: Students use the strategies independently.

Comprehension**

Before Reading- Anticipation Phase

Inferring/Predicting Strategy

Grade

Description: Inferring is the process of creating a personal and unique meaning from text. It involves a mental process that combines what is read with relevant prior knowledge (schema) and predicting what will happen in the text.

KWL

K+

You can help by encouraging a child to talk about what she has read, by pointing out new words and explaining their meaning, and by using strategies such as the K-W-L approach to help children understand what they read.

STW

K+

STW can be used to help students focus on illustrations by asking What do I See? What do I Think? and What do I Wonder? This strategy will enable students to fully experience picture books.

Concept Sort

1.8+

Picture cards are grouped/categorized with the students. A small group project.

DRTA

1.9+

 

 

The Directed Reading Thinking Activity (DRTA) is a comprehension strategy that guides students in asking questions about a text, making predictions, and then reading to confirm or refute their predictions. The DRTA process encourages students to be active and thoughtful readers, enhancing their comprehension.

Think-Pair-Share

2.8+

Students work together as a team to answer a question. They can be timed by the time keeper. A good way for reciprocal teaching. The students and teacher work together as a team to learn.

SQ3R

2.8+

Students begin by surveying or previewing the text, looking for text features that will help them make predictions about content and begin to create a scaffold for their learning. Based on their survey, they develop questions that they will answer as they read.

ReQuest

2.8+

A strategy that  is designed to encourage students to: a) formulate their own questions about the material they are reading and develop questioning behavior; b) adopt an active, inquiring attitude to reading; c) acquire reasonable purposes for reading; and, d) improve their independent reading comprehension skills.

Anticipation Guides

2.8+

A type of graphic organize- the anticipation guide to preview a story before you read it. Before reading, mark whether or not you agree or disagree with each statement. After reading the story, fill in the page number where you found the answer to each statement, tell whether or not you were right, and reflect on what you found.

QAR

2.8+

The QAR strategy helps students clarify the different sources of information available to answer questions during the ReQuest Procedure. The teacher helps the student decide if the questions they asked can be answered from IN-THE-BOOK or INMY-HEAD.

Reciprocal Teaching***

2.8+

The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. Each strategy was selected for a specific purpose.

Story Impressions

3+

The whole idea of this strategy is to give students an opportunity to predict what is going to happen in the story. The teacher creates a list of words from the story that reveal key aspects of the story, including setting, character names or descriptions, plot, and resolution. The student writes the story using these words and phrases. The stories are then shared with the group before the actual story is read.

Questing the Author (QtA)

3.6+

Students read an informational article. They explore questions about the author’s viewpoint, purpose, and style. After analyzing the text, students share their responses, feedback, and evaluations about the effectiveness of the selection.

Concept Def. Map

3.6+

A rather complex but worthwhile graphic organizer.

Other

 

 

 

 

Bloom’s Taxonomy

 

Describe problem solving applying information to produce some result use of facts, rules and principles : how is ... an example of ...? how is ... related to ...? why is ... significant? We ask students to compare, contrast, illustrate, and classify. Teachers ask oral questions and uses graphic organizers such as Venn Diagrams and T-charts.

Other Graphic Organizers

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use. Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

LINK

 

Select a key word or concept: Students will write the word on the chalkboard or transparency. Give students three minutes to list on paper their associations for the word. Ask students to share association.  List student ideas without comment.

Schema Stories

 

A small group of independent readers (four to six children. To have students read for meaning. To have students practice predicting where meaningful sequences fit together.

Admit Slips

 

At the beginning of class or as a brief homework assignment, students are given a slip of paper or index card along with a specific prompt—printed on the paper, written on the board, or delivered orally by the teacher. Students may keep the admit slips throughout class to refer to and add to as they read. The teacher may ask for volunteers to read their admit slips to the class or the students may turn them in so the teacher can read some of them aloud and respond to them.

 

 

 

Determining Importance Strategy

Grade

Description: Proficient learners make purposeful and spontaneous decisions about what is important in text at the: word level words that carry the meaning are contentives -- words that connect are functors -- contentives tend to be more important to the overall meaning of passage than functors; sentence level there are usually key sentences that carry the weight of meaning for a paragraph, passage or section -- often, especially in non-fiction.

Think-Pair-Share

2.8+

Students work together as a team to answer a question. They can be timed by the time keeper. A good way for reciprocal teaching. The students and teacher work together as a team to learn.

Reciprocal Teaching

2.8+

The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. Each strategy was selected for a specific purpose.

 

SQ3R

2.8+

Students begin by surveying or previewing the text, looking for text features that will help them make predictions about content and begin to create a scaffold for their learning. Based on their survey, they develop questions that they will answer as they read.

Story Impressions

3+

The whole idea of this strategy is to give students an opportunity to predict what is going to happen in the story. The teacher creates a list of words from the story that reveal key aspects of the story, including setting, character names or descriptions, plot, and resolution. The student writes the story using these words and phrases. The stories are then shared with the group before the actual story is read.

Other

 

 

 

 

Other Graphic Organizers

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

 

During Reading- Building Knowledge Phase

 Clarifying Strategy

Grade

Description: Become aware of when unfamiliar vocabulary word or an idea that confuses you. Students will use strategies to help them better understand the text.

KWL

K+

You can help by encouraging a child to talk about what she has read, by pointing out new words and explaining their meaning, and by using strategies such as the K-W-L approach to help children understand what they read.

Think-Aloud

1.9+

After spending weeks, sometimes months, modeling your own thinking processes through THINK ALOUDS on a single strategy in a variety of texts, students will gradually be asked to assume responsibility for using the strategy independently as they read.

Reciprocal Teaching***

2.8+

The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. Each strategy was selected for a specific purpose.

Rainbows

3+

A strategy provided them with guidance during reading. The strategy can be modified and used with texts in different languages. The authors encourage teachers to check in with individual students and monitor their understanding and usage of each strategy regularly.

Two-Column

3.5+

This strategy helps students pull the main ideas out of what they read and organize the information effectively. It is very much like outlining without all of the strict rules of formatting. The left-hand column is usually used for the main ideas, which are often the subtopics presented in the selection. The right-hand side is used for elaboration, details about the main ideas.

Other

 

 

 

 

Cubing

 

Cubing is a cooperative reading and writing strategy that encourages critical thinking.  This strategy guides students to construct meaning, discuss, and write about the text from six different perspectives. 

Read and Say Something

 

Use this strategy as a SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY with complex reading: Leader is the first to read a section (paragraph or page). The person to the right asks a question or makes a comment related to the section read. All students in the group must listen and participate by answering the question or continuing the conversation. THEN, the person to the right reads the next session, and the process continues until the reading is complete.

Response Journal

 

A quick sketch or remark on each index card about the section you have read. Next to each box, write three quick notes describing the section you have read. Ex.

Other Graphic Organizers

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use. Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

3mp

 

It is a strategy including a three minute pause to

1. Summarize Key Points So Far

2. Add Your Own Thoughts

3. Pose Clarifying Questions

 

 

Questioning  Strategy

Grade

Description:

Proficient readers ask questions to:

clarify meaning;

speculate about text yet to be read;

to show skepticism or a critical stance;

determine an author's intent, style, content, or format;

locate a specific answer in text, or;

consider rhetorical questions inspired by the text..

KWL

K+

You can help by encouraging a child to talk about what she has read, by pointing out new words and explaining their meaning, and by using strategies such as the K-W-L approach to help children understand what they read.

STW

K+

STW can be used to help students focus on illustrations by asking What do I See? What do I Think? and What do I Wonder? This strategy will enable students to fully experience picture books.

ReQuest

2.8+

A strategy that  is designed to encourage students to: a) formulate their own questions about the material they are reading and develop questioning behavior; b) adopt an active, inquiring attitude to reading; c) acquire reasonable purposes for reading; and, d) improve their independent reading comprehension skills.

QAR

2.8+

The QAR strategy helps students clarify the different sources of information available to answer questions during the ReQuest Procedure. The teacher helps the student decide if the questions they asked can be answered from IN-THE-BOOK or INMY-HEAD.

Think-Aloud

1.9+

After spending weeks, sometimes months, modeling your own thinking processes through THINK ALOUDS on a single strategy in a variety of texts, students will gradually be asked to assume responsibility for using the strategy independently as they read.

Questing the Author

3.6+

Students read an informational article. They explore questions about the author’s viewpoint, purpose, and style. After analyzing the text, students share their responses, feedback, and evaluations about the effectiveness of the selection.

Other

 

 

 

 

Other Graphic Organizers

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use. Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

Big Books with Post-its

 

Before reading the text, the teacher strategically places post-its over words or phrases in the big book. The post-it’s cover up important information to be answered by students usually in unison.

3mp

 

It is a strategy including a three minute pause to

1. Summarize Key Points So Far

2. Add Your Own Thoughts

3. Pose Clarifying Questions

Bloom’s Taxonomy

K+

Describe problem solving applying information to produce some result use of facts, rules and principles : how is ... an example of ...? how is ... related to ...? why is ... significant? We ask students to compare, contrast, illustrate, and classify. Teachers ask oral questions and uses graphic organizers such as Venn Diagrams and T-charts.

 

Synthesizing Strategy

Grade

Description (*note: used during and after read)

Proficient readers are aware of changes in their ideas and conclusions about text as they read further into the text;

Proficient readers understand and can articulate how their thinking about a given text evolves and/or as the text itself changes;

Proficient readers maintain a cognitive synthesis as they read. They monitor the overall meaning and themes in the text as they read and are aware of the ways text elements "fit together" to create that overall meaning and theme;

KWL

K+

You can help by encouraging a child to talk about what she has read, by pointing out new words and explaining their meaning, and by using strategies such as the K-W-L approach to help children understand what they read.

Think-Aloud

1.9+

After spending weeks, sometimes months, modeling your own thinking processes through THINK ALOUDS on a single strategy in a variety of texts, students will gradually be asked to assume responsibility for using the strategy independently as they read.

Reciprocal Teaching***

2.8+

The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. Each strategy was selected for a specific purpose.

Post It’s

2.8+

The post-it’s have a letter on top right corner helping the student mark or notice certain elements of literacy. Ex. v= vocabulary m=main idea, etc.. After completed they can be placed on a graphic organizer or scrape paper. Then, used to summarize important information.

SQ3R

2.8+

Students begin by surveying or previewing the text, looking for text features that will help them make predictions about content and begin to create a scaffold for their learning. Based on their survey, they develop questions that they will answer as they read.

Selective Highlighting

3.6+

Selective Highlighting/Underlining is used to help students organize what they have read by selecting what is important. This strategy teaches students to highlight/underline ONLY the key words, phrases, vocabulary, and ideas that are central to understanding the reading.

Other

 

 

 

 

Other Graphic Organizers

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use. Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

 

Visualizing Strategy

Grade

Description: Proficient learners spontaneously and purposefully create images while and after

they read. The images emerge from all five senses and the emotions and are anchored in a reader's prior knowledge. Proficient readers use images to immerse themselves in rich detail as they read.

The detail gives depth and dimension to the reading, engaging the reader and making the text more memorable

KWL

K+

You can help by encouraging a child to talk about what she has read, by pointing out new words and explaining their meaning, and by using strategies such as the K-W-L approach to help children understand what they read.

Think-Aloud

1.9+

After spending weeks, sometimes months, modeling your own thinking processes through THINK ALOUDS on a single strategy in a variety of texts, students will gradually be asked to assume responsibility for using the strategy independently as they read.

Reciprocal Teaching***

2.8+

The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. Each strategy was selected for a specific purpose.

SQ3R

2.8+

Students begin by surveying or previewing the text, looking for text features that will help them make predictions about content and begin to create a scaffold for their learning. Based on their survey, they develop questions that they will answer as they read.

Post It’s

2.8+

The post-it’s have a letter on top right corner helping the student mark or notice certain elements of literacy. Ex. v= vocabulary m=main idea, etc.. After completed they can be placed on a graphic organizer or scrape paper. Then, used to summarize important information.

Other

 

 

 

 

Other Graphic Organizers

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use. Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

 

 

After Reading- Consolation Phase

Summarizing Strategy

Grade

Description: Retelling and Summarizing- In your own words (written or oral discussion- both), give a brief statement that contains all the important ideas.

KWL

K+

You can help by encouraging a child to talk about what she has read, by pointing out new words and explaining their meaning, and by using strategies such as the K-W-L approach to help children understand what they read.

Think-Pair-Share

2.8+

Students work together as a team to answer a question. They can be timed by the time keeper. A good way for reciprocal teaching. The students and teacher work together as a team to learn.

Reciprocal Teaching***

2.8+

The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. Each strategy was selected for a specific purpose.

Other

 

 

 

 

Other Graphic Organizers (ex. Venn)

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use. Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

Story Mapping

 

A visual depiction of the settings or the sequence of major events and actions of story characters. This procedure enables students to relate story events and to perceive structure in literary selections. By sharing personal interpretations of stories through illustrations, students increase their understanding and appreciation of selections. Story maps can be used as frameworks for storytelling or retelling, and as outlines for story writing.

Discussion Web

 

A Discussion Web helps students visualize the key elements of an issue and quickly identify opposing points of view on the matter. This organizational tool guides discussions by allowing students to identify ideas of contention, to weigh opposing viewpoints, to critically evaluate the arguments, and to draw conclusions.

Writing using Writers Workshop Format

 

rehearsing, drafting, revising, editing, sharing (RDRES)

Learning Log

 

Students integrate content, process, and personal feelings. Learning logs operate from the stance that students learn from writing rather than writing what they have learned. The common application is to have students make entries in their logs during the last five minutes of class or after each completed week of class. The message here is that short, frequent bursts of writing are more productive over time than are infrequent, longer assignments.

GIST

 

Define what the "gist" of something is. Read the first paragraph/section of the assigned reading. The size of the section will depend upon the

grade level and size of the complete text. Write a 20 word summary that describes the main idea in that section. Read the second paragraph/section of the assigned reading. Write a 20 word summary that combines the material in the first gist statement and the new material. Continue this procedure until a 20 word summary is created for the entire reading.

Journals-Logs

 

Metacognition involves understanding how you came to learn something. Use

this page to help you think about what you learned and how you learned it. There are several types of journals and logs available.

Exit Slips

 

Slips of paper that the student turns in stating any question they may still have, what they learned etc.

Save-the-Last Word

 

Students are given 3x5 note cards. It is explained that after reading an assigned passage, they are to find three to five quotations from the text that they really like. Students then read the material and write one quotation on one side of each card. On the other side, they tell why they like it. Students then share their quotations, one at a time.

Two-Column

3.5+

This strategy helps students pull the main ideas out of what they read and organize the information effectively. It is very much like outlining without all of the strict rules of formatting. The left-hand column is usually used for the main ideas, which are often the subtopics presented in the selection. The right-hand side is used for elaboration, details about the main ideas.

Cubing

 

Cubing is a cooperative reading and writing strategy that encourages critical thinking.  This strategy guides students to construct meaning, discuss, and write about the text from six different perspectives. 

 

Vocabulary**

 

Strategy

Grade

 

Word Work-Sorts

K+

Closed sort (teacher-defined categories):

• Select a group of words to be studied.

• Identify labels for each category based on the word study skill or concept being

studied (e.g. words with the base word migrate and the base word nation; or words

that are adverbs and words that are adjectives).

• Ask students to sort the words into the appropriate categories noticing the relationship

between the words.

• Type words so they are ready to be cut out and manipulated for younger children.

Older students could copy from the overhead or the board as they choose where to

place the words (see Vocabulary Resources section for sample).

Open sort (student-defined categories):

• Ask students to select the categories based on their own criteria.

• Discuss why the students placed the words in each category.

KWL

K+

You can help by encouraging a child to talk about what she has read, by pointing out new words and explaining their meaning, and by using strategies such as the K-W-L approach to help children understand what they read.

Word Splash

1.7+

A Word Splash is an additional way for students to organize words. It allows students to classify words in a category and the different ways one word can be used

Concept Sort

1.8+

Picture cards are grouped/categorized with the students. A small group project.

Think-Aloud

1.9+

After spending weeks, sometimes months, modeling your own thinking processes through THINK ALOUDS on a single strategy in a variety of texts, students will gradually be asked to assume responsibility for using the strategy independently as they read.

DRTA

1.9+

The Directed Reading Thinking Activity (DRTA) is a comprehension strategy that guides students in asking questions about a text, making predictions, and then reading to confirm or refute their predictions. The DRTA process encourages students to be active and thoughtful readers, enhancing their comprehension.

Reciprocal Teaching***

2.8+

The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. Each strategy was selected for a specific purpose.

SQ3R

2.8+

Students begin by surveying or previewing the text, looking for text features that will help them make predictions about content and begin to create a scaffold for their learning. Based on their survey, they develop questions that they will answer as they read.

Frayer Model

3.5+

Analyze the key word or concept you will be presenting to the students. Develop a list of characteristics that are critical to the definition of the word.

Semantic Feature Analysis

3.5+

Semantic Feature Analysis uses a grid to help you explore how a set of things are related to one another. By analyzing the grid you'll be able to see connections, make predictions and master important concepts. You'll also realize things that you don't know yet, so you'll know what additional research you need to do.

Other

 

 

 

 

Bottom up

 

To be effective, an extensive and long-term vocabulary development program accompanying a parallel schemata or background-knowledge-development program is probably called for. Instead of preteaching vocabulary for single reading passages, teachers should teach vocabulary and background knowledge concurrently for sets of passages to be read at some later time.

Cloze

 

Ex. There are four types of poisonous snakes in North America. One of these is ___ rattlesnake, which belongs to ___ family that is often___ pit viper. T

In the List-Group-Label

 

Brainstorming allows students to share words they know that are associated with a key concept. Students access their prior knowledge in relation to the concept the teacher has chosen for their focus. Producing lists of words helps students be aware of how much they know about the topic and captures their interest in a topic or concept.

Other Graphic Organizers

1.6+

Look at complexity to determine use. Model during whole group ideally can be used by the individual independently to help them organize their thoughts about the text. A good way to have them thinks about what they read. Also, good for setting goals before they read. 

 

 

Fluency**

Reading Together: Strategy

Description

Readers Theatre

In this lesson, students develop scripts, perform in groups, and practice using their voice to depict characters from texts. Through this activity, students have the opportunity to develop fluency and further enhance comprehension of what they are reading.

Cue Phrase Boundaries in Text

In the summer/I like/to swim/at the beach.//

Although it’s very hot/ I like the idea/ of being in the cool water/

all day.// Summer truly is/ my favorite time/ of the year.//

Phrase-Cued Text Weekly Practice (5 days)

Day 1

*select, copy, and distribute a marked text passage (100-250 wds)

*model reading the marked text aloud 2 or 3 times as students follow along

*have students use the marked text to read aloud chorally—discuss content

Literature Circles- Alternatively called "reading circle,"

This group approach to reading can improve and extend students' understanding of what they read. Although it is often used with fiction, it also works well with informational text. The strategy may involve students assuming roles within their circle, i.e., "leader," "summarizer," "connector," etc. A variation on this idea may be found in Jennifer Bernhard's best practice seventh-grade social studies lesson.

Shared Reading

The shared reading model often uses oversized books (referred to as big books) with enlarged print and illustrations. As the teacher reads the book aloud, all of the children who are being read to can see and appreciate the print and illustrations.

Paired Reading

Paired reading is a technique that allows tutors to vary the amount of support they provide to a child while reading aloud together. Explain to the child that sometimes you will read aloud together – duet reading – and sometimes he or she will read alone – solo reading. Agree on two signals the child can use to switch back and forth from solo to duet reading. When the child gives you the duet signal, you will begin reading together. When the child feels ready for solo reading, she will give the solo signal and you will stop reading

Guided Reading

The GRP, otherwise known as the Guided Reading Procedure, may be used with both narrative and expository texts. This strategy is designed to assist students in recalling what has been read, to help them generate their own questions while reading, to instill the importance of self-correction, and to improve organizational skills. GRP is most appropriate in middle school through college-level classrooms.

Text Sets- Study Circles

The text sets used in literature study circles are usually multiple copies of the same text to provide a focus for shared meaning. However, text sets may be a collection of different books on a related topic. Using sets of different texts encourages students to compare, contrast, and make connections in a reading discussion group. Related poetry may be included as text sets as well as different versions of particular fairy tales or collections of books by the same author.

Read Aloud

Reading a text aloud: modeling what good readers do purposefully interacting with the text

Echo Reading

This is another way to help a child develop confidence and fluency. Read aloud a line of text. Ask the child to read the same line. Continue taking turns reading and rereading the same lines. When the child begins to read with more expression and fluency, suggest that he read aloud on his own.

Coral Reading

This strategy helps children become more fluent and confident readers. Hold the book together and ask the child to read along with you. Begin reading in a voice that is slightly louder and faster than the child's. As the child becomes more comfortable with reading the text, lower your voice and slow down your reading speed. If the child slows down, increase your volume and speed again.

Re-reading

The repeated readings of the same story serve various purposes. The first reading is for enjoyment; the second may focus on building and extending comprehension of the selection; a third might focus attention on the interesting language and vocabulary; a fourth might focus on decoding, using the words in the selection as a starting point for teaching word identification skills.

Independent-@indepRL

Aka SSR

SELF-SELECTED READING occurs DAILY

• Access to books

• Comfortable reading environment

• Quiet reading environment

Also, increase vocabulary!

DEAR

Drop Everything And Read (DEAR) time is a time that is set aside daily for independent reading by both students and teachers. Every person in the class is to drop everything and read. DEAR time takes in consideration a variety of student interests and ability levels, because each student selects for himself or herself the book or books he or she wishes to read.

 

 

Word Knowledge

Strategy

Grade

Ex. Activities

Alphabet Knowledge

Preschool-K+

Description: Alphabet knowledge is naming the letters of the alphabet and recognizing the letter symbols in print (

 

 

·         HM-AlphaTales (Animals Shaped Letters)

·         Three Period Lesson

·         Moveable Alphabet

·         Sandpaper Letters

·         Leap Frog

·         Alphabet Books

Phonological Awareness**/***

Preschool-K+

Description: Is the ability to hear, identify, and manipulate sounds of spoken language.

Lang. and Listening

 

·         Around the World

·         Morning Message

·         Telephone

·         Books

·         HM Language Cards

·         Vocabulary-picture-word cards

Rhyming

 

·         Cloze Procedure-chants, songs

·         Rhyming BINGO

·         Rhyming Concentration

·         Nursery Rhyme Journal           

·         HM Language Cards

·         Thumbs UP

Alliteration

 

·         Cloze Procedure

·         Alliteration Listing      

·         HM Language Cards

·         Alliteration folder

·         Word Wall

Syllables (start w/ first name, last, address)

 

·         Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes..Tell Me How

·         Tambourine

·         HM Language Cards

·         STOMP

·         Syllable Match

Sentence segmenting (start with sentence, word, letter)

 

·         Morning Message

·         Sentence Strips

·         Common Stories

Phonemic Awareness

K+

Description: It is the ability to think notice, think about and work with individual sounds in spoken words.

Onset-rime

 

·         Leap Frog

·         Word Study- Word Work

·         Word Study- Word Work

·         Home-made Books

Blending & Segmenting Phonemes/letter patterns

 

·         Slinky Game

·         ARM

Phonics

K+

Description: A method of teaching beginners to read and pronounce words by learning the phonetic value of letters, letter groups, and especially syllables

Letter Sounds

Blends/Digraphs

Phonetic Rules

Special Vowel Sounds

Special Consonants

 

 

 

·         Decoding Games

·         Sound Boxes

·         Who Let the A Out

·         I Spy

·         Knock,,,Knock

·         HM Phonics Center

·         HM letter cards

·         Word Play

·         Word Wall

 

Handwriting-Writing-Spelling

P-1

2nd-3rd

ABC Order

Write your words in alphabetical order

 Rainbow Words

Write your words in three colors

 Picture Words

Draw a picture and write your words in the picture

 Scrambled Words

Write your words and then write them again with the letters mixed

 Ransom Words

Write your words by cutting out letters in a newspaper or magazine and glue

them on a paper

 Pyramid Words

Write your words adding one letter at a time

 Words-In-Words

Write your word and then write at least 2 words made from each

 Delicious Words

Write your words in whipped cream, peanut butter, or anything you can eat

 Good Clean Words

Write your words in shaving cream on a counter or some other surface that can

be cleaned safely

 Dirty Words

Write your words in mud or sand

 Pasta Words

Write your words by arranging alphabet pasta or Alphabits. Glue on paper or bring

me a note from a parent and do on a table or counter at home

 3D Words

Use modeling clay rolled thinly to make your words

 Magazine Words

Use an old magazine or newspaper and find your word

 Cheer Your Words

Pretend you are a cheerleader and call out your words

 Sound Words

Use tape recorder and record your words and their spelling

 X Words

Write two words having one common letter so they criss-cross

 Other Handed

If you are right-handed, write with your left, or vice versa

 Choo-Choo Words

Write the entire list end-to-end as one long word, using different colors of crayon or

ink for different words

 Silly String

With a long length of string, "write" words in cursive, using the string to shape the

letters.

 Back Writing

Using your finger, draw each letter on a partners' back, having the partner say the

word when completed

 Telephone Words

Translate your words into numbers from a telephone keypad

 Flash Writing

In a darkened room, use a flashlight to draw letters in the air

 Newspaper Words

Search a newspaper page from top to bottom, circling each letter of a word as you

find it

 30 Second Words

Write a TV commercial using all the words from your list

 Popsicles

Make words using popsicle sticks

 Secret Agent Words

Number the alphabet from 1 to 26, then convert your words to a number code

 Etch-A-Word

Use an Etch-A-Sketch to write your words

·         Writing Chart

·         Possible Sentences

·         Choosing a topic

The child decides what she wants to write about. You can help the child come up with a topic by thinking about his own experiences or books he has read.

·         Drafting

The child is likely to write several drafts of the same piece. Writing evolves over time so first drafts differ greatly from final ones. During the drafting step, young children may talk and draw as much as they write. Many times their first drafts are quite short.

First drafts are likely to have grammatical, spelling, and punctuation mistakes. At this point in the writing process, you do not need to correct these mistakes. The child will correct these mistakes as she revises, rewrites, and edits subsequent drafts. You can support the child by responding to the content of her drafts and asking questions to help her focus on how to express her ideas clearly.

·         Revising

The child might decide she is no longer interested in the topic she chose or she might decide to expand it. Younger children are likely to make their stories longer. More experienced writers might add to descriptions, move sections, or rewrite sentences or paragraphs. You can continue to offer support by answering questions, making suggestions, and responding to the child's ideas.

·         Conferencing

In classroom writing workshops, children discuss their drafts and get encouragement and feedback from teachers and peers. You can assume this role by listening, asking questions, and making comments that guide the child to improve writing drafts.

·         Sharing

This helps children understand how their audience responds to their writing. They learn what the audience understood and what they did not. This helps children make their messages as clear as possible. You can serve as the audience for a child's writing and encourage the child's family to do the same.

·         Editing

Older children finalize their drafts by reviewing and correcting errors in punctuation, grammar, and spelling. Ask the child to circle the words she thinks are misspelled. Many children have a visual memory that lets them know that a word is not written conventionally, even if they don't know how to spell it. Help the child use a dictionary to look up correct spellings.

·         Publishing

This step lets the child make the writing available to others. A tutoring program could accomplish this through a newsletter or collection of children's finished work. A child might bind her work with a cover and illustrations and share it with her family and teacher

 

 

 

ALL

Grades

ABC books

Accordion books

Advertisements

Advice columns

Almanacs

Anecdotes

Applications

Articles

Banners

Bingo game

Biographies

Biographical sketches

Book jackets or blurbs

Booklets

Books

Book reviews

Book responses

Calendars

Cartoons

Collages

Comic strips

Contracts

Data Disks

Debates

Demonstrations

Descriptions

Dialogues

Dialogue Journal

Diaries

Dictations

Diorama

Dictionaries

Directions

Directories

Dry Erase

Editorials/Op-Eds

Epitaphs

Fantasies

Flap books

Flip charts

Folktales

Ghost stories

Graphic Organizer

Greeting cards

Grocery List

Guides

Handbooks

Headlines

Historical timelines

Historical sketches

Homemade Books

Interviews

Jingles

Jokes (riddles/puzzles/etc.) Legends

Journals

Lesson Plans

Letters (formal/personal/etc.)

Limericks

List

Listening Walk- Clip Board

Logs

Manuals

Memos

Menus

Monologues

Morning Message

Murals

Musicals

Myths

Newscast

Newspaper article

Notebook

Observation Notes

Playbills

Plays

Poems

Pop-up books

Postcards

Posters

Proposals Quilts

Quote Book

Radio report

Reading Autobiography

Rebuttals

Receipts

Requests

Responses

Resumes

Reviews

Sales presentation

Schedules

Science fiction

Science Journals

Scrapbooks

Scripts

Shared Pen

Songs

Speeches

Stories

Story Cube

Story wheels

Summaries

Table of Contents

Tall tales

Technical manuals

Telegrams

Templates

Tongue twisters

Travel brochures

Travelogues

Triaromas

Tributes

Videos

Wanted posters

Webpages

Word Wall Words

Yearbooks

 

 

Virtual Literacy

Grade

Resource:

P

Games- brainpop.com, www.starfall.com

K

Games- brainpop.com, www.starfall.com

1st

Games- brainpop.com

 

Story- Word Processing or web published – mixbooks

etc., DTP, Presentation, podcasting, photostory,

voicethread

 

Song-finale notepad, Word Processing, Sound

recorder, Audacity, podcasting, recording narration in

presentations [photostory 3, powerpoint, impress

2nd

Presentation-presentation tools - Powerpoint,

Impress, Zoho presentation tool, Photostory, Google

present. Comic creation tools – comic life,

hypercomic, online tools

 

Comic creation tools – comic life, historic

tale construction kit, Animations – www.dvolver.com)

Programming Visual Studio.net (& Express the free

version) Lego Mindstorms & Robolab, Scratch, Alice.

3rd

Film-Movie maker, Pinnacle Studio, Adobe premier

elements Online tools www.jumpcut.com,

www.eyespot.com, www.pinnacleshare.com,

www.cuts.com, www.animoto.com, www.dvolver.com

 

 

ELL/ESL

 

http://www.icdlbooks.org/

(Great site for books around the world – inviting children to be part of a global

community.)

 

 Free books to read on site, many multilingual.

https://ttms.box.net/flp

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://eslus.com/eslcenter.htm

 

http://eslsite.com/

 

http://www.catesol.org/resource.html

 

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/678/01/

 

References- Additional Websites

Readers Theatre:

http://www.aaronshep.com/rt/

http://www.teachingheart.net/readerstheater.htm

http://www.cdli.ca/CITE/langrt.htm

http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Tower/3235

http://www.storycart.com

http://loiswalker.com/catalog/guidesamples.html

http://www.readinglady.com

http://home.sprynet.com/~palermo/intr_rdio.htm

http://home.sprynet.com/~palermo/radiokit.htm

http://www.margiepalatini.com

http://www.fictionteachers.com/classroomtheater/theater.html

http://hometown.aol.com/rcswallow/

http://www.readingonline.org/electronic/elec_index.asp?HREF=carrick/index.html

http://www.literacyconnections.com/ReadersTheater.html

http://bms.westport.k12.ct.us/mccormick/rt/RTHOME.htm

http://www.readerstheatre.ecsd.net/collection.htm

http://www.vtaide.com/png/theatre.htm

 

Read Alouds:

www.trelease-on-reading.com - comprehensive website on read alouds by Jim Trelease, author of the Read Aloud

Handbook. Printable brochures on various aspects of read-alouds are also available.

www.readingrockets.org/blog/16287 - informational site with areas for parents, teachers, students, and librarians

www.nncc.org/Literacy/better.read.aloud.html - instructions for read alouds - information plus ideas for

extending the read aloud

www.randomhouse.com/rhpg/promos/greatbooks/boys/tips.html - read aloud tips

 

Comprehension :

http://www.readingquest.org/strat/

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/3479/

http://www.literacy.uconn.edu/compre.htm (Scroll down to comprehension section)

http://teacher.scholastic.com/LessonPlans/pdf/oct_nov05/9SixComprehension.pdf

http://www.justreadnow.com/strategies/organization.htm

http://www.readingrecovery.org/reading_recovery/federal/Essential/comprehension.asp

http://www.adlit.org/strategy_library/

http://www.literacy.uconn.edu/adolit.htm

http://www.ngsp.net/Portals/0/Downloads/HBNETDownloads/Edge_Mono_Moore1.pdf

 

Fluency:

 

Vocabulary:

ttp://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/VocabularyStrategies.html

http://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/vocabulary.html

http://www.cobbk12.org/cheathamhill/lfs%20update/vocabulary%20and%20word%20walls.htm

http://www.justreadnow.com/strategies/vocabulary.htm

http://www.k12reader.com/effective-strategies-for-teaching-vocabulary/

http://web.cesa5.k12.wi.us/site_uploads/news/newsfile1845_1.pdf

http://www.readingquest.org/strat/wordmap.html

 

General websites and list serves:

http://www.ncte.org/dayonwriting/about

http://readinglady.com/mosaic/tools/tools.htm.

http://readinglady.com .www.readinga-z.com

www.teachersnetwork.org

www.sitesforteachers.com

www.preschoolprintables.com

www.crayola.com

www.freecoloringpages.com

www.coloring.com

www.discoverykids.com

www.ditk-kids.com

www.disney.go.com

www.abcteach.com

www.kidszone.com

www.schoolexpress.com

www.tinsnips.com

www.senteacher.com

www.edhelper.com

www.brailebooks.com

www.prekpages.com

www.hubbardscubbard.com

www.macte.com

www.readwritethink.org/lessons

http://hill.troy.k12.mi.us/staff/bnewingham/myweb3/

http://www.lauracandler.com/

www.kinderkorner.com/colors.html Color

www.ttms.org

www.eddept.wa.edu.au

.www.textmapping.org/

www.share2learn.com/index.html An excellent site for literacy in general

www.middleweb.com/ReadWrkshp/RWndex.html Focused on upper elementary and

middle school.

http://www.four-blocks.com

www.saraholbrook.com Great poetry site.

www.niehs.nih/gov/kids/lyrics

https://ttms.org/

Starfall.com

www.readkiddoread.com

<http://www.readkiddoread.com>

www.aaronshep.com

http://storytrail.com/pages/why.html

http://www.frankserafini.com/index.html Great website. book lists. He’s a prof with

www.lexile.com

www.guidedreading.scholastic.ca/index

www.ala.org

AR bookfinder.com

State

DOE….

Ed Policy

www.asu.edu/educ/epsl/epru.htm

Professional Organizations

www.reading.org International Reading Association

www.ncte.org/about National Council Teachers of English

www.writingproject.org

www.tolerance.org/teach/index Subscribe to free magazine focused on teaching

tolerance/critical issues

www.heineman.org

www.stenhouse.org

www.makebeliefscomix.com/comic

http://www.reading.org

 

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/

 

http://www.readwritethink.org

 

http://www.choiceliteracy.com/

 

http://owl.english.purdue.edu

 

http://www.readingteachersnetwork.org/

 

http://dww.ed.gov/

 

http://storyoftheweek.loa.org

 

http://www.teachingstrategies.com/

 

http://www.ncte.org

 

http://www.brainpopjr.com/

 

http://www.benchmarkeducation.com

 

http://www.nea.org

http://thereadinglady.org

http://www.powayusd.com/projects/edtechcentralnew/k-1Standards.htm

www.consciousdiscipline.com

www.drjean.org

www.preschoolactivitybox.com

www.first-school.ws/INDEX.HTM

www.kinderpages.com

www.treasureboxtoys.com

www.kidssoup.com/

www.makinglearningfun.com

www.pbs.org/teachers/

www.redshift.com

www.education.com Book Leveling Sites

 

 

Book Levels by Publisher:

BSD: Leveled Books Database

Books for Teachers ~ Page 5

Correlations & Leveling

Level I LeveledBooks.com - The Best Books for Emergent & Beginning

Leveled Text List Database of leveled books

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Hollow/1213/teacherbooks5.html

http://204.98.1.2/isu/langarts/alphaoct99.pdf

www.k111.k12.il.us/lafayette/fourblocks/wright_group_table.htm

www.k111.k12.il.us/lafayette/fourblocks/book_levels.htm

Leveling sites are listed below.

http://204.98.1.2/isu/langarts/bklst.html

http://registration.beavton.k12.or.us/lbdb/default.htm

http://www.teachers.k12.sd.us/pa004/Leveled%20Book%20List%20Sit

es.htm

http://www.pps.k12.or.us/curriculum/literacy/leveled_books/

http://www.leveledbooks.com/

http://users.oasisol.com/daireme/book.htm

 

 

 

AR Levels:

http://www.mury.k12.ut.us/LGV/LGV.htm

Google: Rigby and Scholastic

http://www.rigby.com/corrlevel/level/charts/readlevel.asp

http://www.wrightgroup.com/literacy/level.php

www.Suite101.com

http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/1411/91865

Website is www.WRightGroup.com

Steck-Vaughn - 10 pg. booklet titled Guided Reading Leveled Books and

Sets. It doesn't give word counts and uses the following leveling

criteria from Fountas and Pinnell:

Level A = Grade level K

Level B = Grade level K-1

Levels C-H = Grade level 1

Level I = Grade level 1 (late)

Level J = Grade level 2 (early)

Level K-M = Grade level 2 Example: Level L: Carlita Ropes the

Level N = Grade level 3

Level O = Grde level 3-4

Steck-Vaughn Co. 1-800-531-5015 www.steck-vaughn.com or email:

info@steckvaughn.com

 

 

Assessment

Formal

Informal

QRI 5-Qualtative Reading Inventory

 

Oral Reading & Writing Observations

 

LELA- Language and Early Literacy Assessment

 

HM.com

PearsonGroup.com

StoryTown.com

 

(DIBELS) Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy

 

Multiple-choice exam

 

Essays

 

Short-answer or problem-solving exam

 

The 6+1 Traits rubric

Reading Logs

Ongoing

Graphic Organizers

Post-it Notes

Documents use of strategies

Author Style Chart

Documents knowledge of authors studied Audio/Video Tapes

Rubrics (Fluency, Readers Theatre, writing, reading, spelling, essay, etc.)

Anecdotal Records

Running Records Running Records

http://www.readinga-z.com/newfiles/levels/runrecord/runrec.html

Observation

http://www.teachervision.fen.com/read-aloud/assessment/48545.html

Lab report

Research paper

Oral Presentations

Comprehensive portfolios